Wednesday

7 Tips For Healthy Winter Hair and Scalp

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 [Source: SavvyBrown]

In an Onyx Rose poll a couple months ago, many of you were tired of summer's effect on your hair (high temperatures, humidity), and you couldn't wait for the fall/winter months. Hot summer days are long gone, but you're not out of the woods yet. Here are some tips to maintain your hair's health throughout the winter:



via huffingtonpost.com:

1. Revamp Your Haircare Routine:
Take a hint: dull, dry, brittle, flat or unsightly frizz is your clue. Your healthy haircare routine that worked this past summer into fall likely needs tweaking. No need to get crazy and dump all your products. Set aside your abrasive clarifying shampoos and opt for the mild, hydrating, non-sulfate, color-safe gentler cleansers. Oribe offers a great moisturizing cream shampoo. Light-weight conditioners may also need to make room for deep penetrating moisturizers, intensive hydrating masks and silicone-free vitamin-packed conditioners.

2. Mind Your Scalp
To relieve itchy scalp symptoms try a fancy salon scalp message and treatment. This way you can relax while blood flow and circulation are stimulated, motivating your natural oils to produce. Or do-it-yourself with natural butters and oils such as shea, coconut, olive or jojoba -- each is an ideal weekly shampoo prep. Apply one tablespoon straight from the bottle or jar and massage into scalp for a few minutes, work through hair then shampoo and condition. (Hint: Rub a few drops into your hands while you're at it, then slip into plastic gloves and a warm nail mitt for 10 minutes.)

3. Cut Excessive Heat
If you must use a hairdryer switch to medium or low blow and use only the warm or cool settings. Flat irons and heated curling sticks should be used less frequently and only on medium heat. Try ceramic ionic styling tools for hair-cuticle protection, breakage control and static guard. Air drying, sponge rollers and natural styling are healthy alternatives to the perfect blowout and are great ways to introduce a more relaxed style. A twisted knot or braid can reveal texture when done or tousled waves when undone.

4. Invest in a Humidifer
This easy-to-use, inexpensive item is great for your office, kitchen and bedroom. Indoor heating substantially perpetuates the problem of dehydrated, lifeless, frizzy and unruly static-electricity-riddled hair. The moisture and replenishing your hair and scalp need can be achieved by running humidifiers during the day or at night while you sleep. Great for your skin, too! You may add essential oils such as eucalyptus or lavander to the water and enjoy the benefits of aromatherapy.

5. Be Mindful of Your Styling Products
Ditch the high-alcohol and chemical-laden gels, mouses and volumizers -- they are too drying and weak havoc on your scalp. Instead use purposeful multitasking potions such as leave-in vitamin-packed conditioners, Argan serums, and pastes with humectants that attract and lock in moisture and replenish your scalp and hair shaft. Aveda's Brilliant Humectant Pomade is excellent for finishing touches, a pinch here and there adds texture, definition and shine while moisturizing at the same time.

6. Try Eco-Friendly Styling Tools
Switch from plastic to wooden, bone or ceramic combs, and try boar-bristled or ceramic brushes for static control, less scalp irritation and minimized hair breakage. It is important to keep your hair thoroughly brushed to avoid the snarls and dreaded rat nests that build every time you take on and off your coat, wool scarves, hats, and hooded garments. It is best to pull hair back with nonmetal wider-sized pony bands and u-shaped hairpins for less damage to hair shaft.

7. Accessorize!
Besides being great fashion statements, these accessories double as cold-weather barriers that safeguard your scalp and hair against cold temperatures, rain and snow. Keep headgear fitting looser -- its easier to revamp a hairstyle and better for scalp circulation. Add a satin lining or put a fabric sheet inside any hat to minimize hair static. Stick with silk or satin scarves as nylon and wool tend to promote snarls, knots and static electricity with longer hair.


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